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Scoreboard Roundup 4/30/18

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Saturday’s sports events:  INTERLEAGUE Final  Cincinnati   8  Minnesota   2   ——   AMERICAN LEAGUE Final  Boston        4  Tampa Bay       3 Final  Baltimore     5  Detroit         3 Final  Toronto       7  Texas           2 Final  Seattle      10  Cleveland       4 Final  Houston       8  Oakland         4 Final  Kansas City   5  Chi White Sox   4 Final  N-Y Yankees   2  L-A Angels      1   ——   NATIONAL LEAGUE Final  Miami           3  Colorado       0 Final  Atlanta        10  Philadelphia   1 Final  Washington      3  Arizona        1 Final  Pittsburgh      5  St. Louis      0 Final  Chi Cubs        2  Milwaukee      0 Final  N-Y Mets       14  San Diego      2 Final  San Francisco   4  L-A Dodgers    2   ——   NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFS Final  Cleveland  105  Indiana  101 Final  Houston    110  Utah      96   ——   NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYOFFS Final  Washington   4  Pittsburgh   1 Final 2OT  Nashville    5  Winnipeg   4Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund Written bycenter_img April 30, 2018 /Sports News – National Scoreboard Roundup 4/30/18last_img read more

Purplebricks prepares to radically change its fixed fee model

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Purplebricks prepares to radically change its fixed fee model previous nextAgencies & PeoplePurplebricks prepares to radically change its fixed fee modelCompany’s CEO says it is looking at several options due to launch this Autumn including dual fees and split payments at instruction and sale.Nigel Lewis3rd August 202002,333 Views Purplebricks has announced that it is to reduce its up-front fee of £999 this Autumn following an in-depth pricing study, CEO Vic Darvey has revealed in the hybrid agency’s annual results.He also says the company is looking at splitting the payment between listing and completion, lowering the cost of instructing the company but raising the overall fee.“Reducing the upfront fee will reduce the barrier for many customers in instructing us – while higher fees on completion will allow our LPEs to earn more from each sale, ensuring our self-employed model will not only remain sustainable but become more attractive to the best talent in the industry,” he says.Anthony Codling (left) CEO of Twindig, says: “Is ‘pay now perhaps sell later’ coming to an end?“Paying whether or not you sell was always going to be a hard sell in a tough market; Purplebricks instructions fell 23% in the year to 30 April 2020 that’s a very significant fall when the majority of that year was not impacted by COVID.”Purplebricks has put a brave face on its latest results which, as well as lower instructions, reveals declining revenues and profits in the UK.The company’s revenue per instruction was the only bright spot in its financial and annual report which covers its trading during the 12 months to April 30th. This increased by 12% to £1,394. But otherwise revenue dropped by 11% and EBITDA by 53% to £4.2 million.On a group level, the company continues to lose money and its latest results show a loss of £19.2 million as the closure of its US and Australia operations continue to weigh down on its finances, although if its overseas costs are taking out, it only lost £1.8 million.The company is also racing through its cash reserves – which dropped from £62.8 million to £30.1 million.   Purplebricks Anthony Codling vic darvey August 3, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Britain lags behind US on healthy whole grains

first_imgDespite the importance of whole grain consumption being reiterated in the new US Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the UK currently has no plans to introduce specific recommendations on the issue.Although the call to “make at least half your grains whole” remains the same as it was in the 2005 US guidelines, the new dietary advice, published on 31 January, is more specific about how consumers can achieve these targets for example by replacing refined grains with whole grains, said Cynthia Harriman, director of the Whole Grains Council (WGC) in America.She added the WGC also welcomed the validation of the 8g per serving level, “since this is the standard the WGC established through its Whole Grain Stamp program”.While it is recommended that Americans eat at least three portions (around 85g) of whole grains per day, the UK does not have any specific recommendations at the moment, said Bridget Benelam, senior nutrition scientist, British Nutrition Foundation, adding she was not aware of any such plans in the pipeline. “When it comes to starchy carbohydrate food groups, the advice is to choose whole-grain varieties where possible, so it is encouraged,” she said.According to the European Food Information Council, specific barriers to whole grain consumption include a lack of knowledge as to what a whole grain is, a lack of awareness of its health benefits and consumer difficulties in identifying whole-grain foods.Harriman added: “Much of Europe seems to be a bit reticent about promoting whole grains, since the status of any potential European Food Safety Authority health claims is unclear. However, I would urge the UK to step up to the plate and make specific dietary recommendations on whole grains.”At the WGC’s conference, Whole grains: The new norm, in Portland, Oregon last week, Yu Xiaodong, general director of China’s Public Nutrition and Development Center told delegates of the country’s decision last year to make a big push for whole grains. It is now partnering with the WGC to find the best ways to increase consumption of whole grain, said Harriman.>>New US guidelines push higher whole grain consumptionlast_img read more

Advanced Leadership Initiative Fellows launch online social impact review

first_imgThe Harvard Advanced Leadership Initiative (ALI) has launched a new online review dedicated to advancing social impact work across sectors. Founded by a team of current and past ALI Fellows, the Harvard ALI Social Impact Review features original work from Harvard professors and fellows, along with leading thinkers and social impact leaders from business, government, nonprofit organizations and academia.The Social Impact Review aims to bring together diverse stakeholders and voices to drive positive change on significant global issues at a time in history when social impact work is more critical than ever. The online review will focus on social impact work in the sectors of climate and environmental solutions; democracy, law and human rights; education; health; racial and gender equity; and social enterprise and economic development.“We are delighted to offer this new platform for members of the Harvard community and external partners to exchange research, perspectives and experience on social impact leadership,” said Meredith B. Rosenthal, ALI faculty chair and C. Boyden Gray Professor of Health Economics and Policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “This new publication will complement ALI’s goal of supporting social impact leaders to help solve some of society’s most pressing challenges.”Susan Carney Lynch, a 2020 ALI Fellow and one of the founders of the Social Impact Review, said the online publication will strive to showcase new ideas and original work from leaders doing social impact work nationally and globally, both in academia and on the ground, across a wide range of sectors.“A team of 2020 ALI fellows founded the Review early in the pandemic when COVID-19 spotlighted the urgency of addressing health disparities, systemic racism, poverty and inequality,” she said. “With the help of the Social Impact Review, we can raise awareness and propose solutions to influence positive change and accelerate social impact both nationally and internationally.”The Social Impact Review will feature original articles, opinion pieces, interviews, book reviews and biographic features from writers both within the Harvard community and from social impact thinkers and leaders across the private, public, nonprofit and civic sectors around the world.In its inaugural issue, the Review features interviews with Karilyn Crockett, Boston’s first-ever Chief Equity Officer, and the founders of The Lincoln Project; an op-ed by Matthew Nathan, former Surgeon General of the United States Navy; a review of Harvard Business School professor and ALI founder Rosabeth Moss Kanter’s new book, “Thinking Outside the Building”; an interview with Victor Lopez-Carmen, at Native American leader studying at Harvard Medical School; and articles by Harvard University professors Howard Gardner and Joseph Nye.The Social Impact Review will be available online at sir.advancedleadership.harvard.edu and will be updated weekly with new content.last_img read more

Are You Ready for the Information Generation?

first_imgNothing is changing business as rapidly and with as much impact as the changing expectations of the Information Generation, a growing community of digital citizens connected to a global network that puts the world’s information at their fingertips. More than a discrete demographic like the Baby Boomers or the Millennials, the Information Generation represents the larger group of people who are resetting expectations of business, demanding faster, round-the-clock access to services and want more personalized digitized experiences tailored for any smart device.To better understand the impact of the Information Generation on the enterprise customers we serve, EMC partnered with the Institute For The Future and research firm Vanson Bourne to engage experts at think tanks and in industry and academia, along with more than 3,600 business managers and executives around the world. More than nine out of 10 of them agree that technology has transformed customer expectations and that leading companies are redefining the way we buy, work, learn, play and socialize online.To avoid disruption and obsolescence amidst so much change, businesses in every industry agree they need to adopt a digital mindset and do five things exceptionally well:Predictively spot new opportunities (60% agree)Demonstrate transparency and trust (56%)Innovate in an agile way (55%)Deliver a unique and personalized experience (45%)Operate in an always-on, real time manner (38%)While the companies we spoke with acknowledge these five attributes as high priorities for their transformation, very few of them claim they do these extremely well or pervasively across their enterprise today. Most admit to struggling with the ability to capitalize on data. Half say they are experiencing data overload and don’t know how, while only 24 percent claim to be good at turning data into useful information and only 30 percent say they can act on data in real-time.These same companies see digital competition intensifying in the years ahead. By 2020, the Internet will connect seven billion people on the planet, 30 billion devices and 10 million businesses. As the Institute For The Future explains in a new report that EMC is releasing today, all of this points to an even more data-driven future, marked by five fundamental shifts:The Information Economy: people will sell, donate and trade their informationNetworked Systems: inanimate objects will be more responsive and connectedAugmented Decision Making: enhanced by artificial intelligenceMulti-Sensory Communication: more data will be communicated through the sensesPrivacy-Enhancing Technology: individuals will regain more control over their privacyThe release of The Information Generation: Transforming the Future, Today is just the start of what we expect will become an ongoing conversation with our customers and partners in the months ahead. Transforming to a truly information-savvy organization will be critical for every business, and every digital business strategy will require a more robust technology strategy.The race is on. Are you ready for the Information Generation?last_img read more

Readers Rank Their Top 10 Favorite LGBTQ Characters in Musicals

first_imgALISON BECHDEL (Fun Home) MAUREEN (Rent) EMCEE (Cabaret) COLLINS (Rent) ANGEL (Rent) ELDER MCKINLEY (The Book of Mormon) FRANK-N-FURTER (The Rocky Horror Show)center_img JOANNE (Rent) HEDWIG (Hedwig and the Angry Inch) It’s Pride Week, and in honor of the celebration of all things gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer, we asked readers to rank their favorite LGBTQ characters in Broadway musicals on Culturalist. We know it’s tough to just choose just ten in a list including Celie from The Color Purple, Lola in Kinky Boots, Rod in Avenue Q, Roger De Bris in The Producers and tons more. The results are in—here’s who you guys picked! LOLA (Kinky Boots) View Commentslast_img

Avian adventures

first_imgThe chicken was out cold when Brooke Chrisley tied her first surgeon’s knot. Her fellow students occasionally gently pinched the bird’s toe to make sure it was still anesthetized.Chrisley, an East Jackson High School junior, was one of 30 high school students who attended Avian Adventures, a three-day bird science camp hosted every June by the poultry science department at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The high schoolers came from as far away as Point Pleasant, WV, and as close as Athens, Ga. They learned about chicken anatomy, general microbiology, hatching, suturing and bird watching techniques. They also got to experience northeast Georgia by kayaking the Broad River.“My favorite part of the program was dissecting the layer hen,” Chrisley said. “That was pretty cool.”Discovering poultry scienceStarting with nine students in 2004, the program has outgrown its lab space.“It’s the biggest crowd we’ve had,” said CAES poultry science department head Mike Lacy. “We actually had to put people on a waiting list.”UGA poultry professor Mark Compton usually teaches undergraduates and graduates the intricacies of chicken anatomy or biomedical techniques. But for the camp, his classroom is filled with high school students.“When you handle these birds, I want you to treat them with respect,” he told the students before they started suturing.Shalandria Jackson, a senior from Decatur, took a break from practicing stitches on a purple sheet of latex. Her favorite part of the program was the microbiology, she said, seeing “the different types of bacteria from everyday things, especially the type and amount of bacteria that came off of my shoe.”Before Avian Adventures, she hadn’t thought of poultry science as a career option. “Now it’s really interesting,” Jackson said. “Now I’m considering it.”That’s the program’s point, Lacy said, to recruit students into poultry science and other agricultural fields. It also gives students the chance to practice science before they start college.“We usually get two or three students per year from the effort,” Lacy said, “and it seems interest in poultry science increases in every class.”These students not only add to UGA’s numbers, they also help Georgia’s poultry industry fill its job needs.Job outlookGeorgia grows more chickens than any other state. In 2008, Georgia’s broilers and eggs had a combined off-the-farm value of $5.48 billion, the state’s top agricultural industry. Avian Adventures is funded through the Harold Ford Foundation, which is part of the U.S. Poultry and Egg Association. The foundation finances recruitment programs at five other U.S. universities, because the poultry industry needs people.The week Avian Adventures was held, UGA poultry science professor Brian Fairchild was on the phone twice with poultry companies.“I got on the phone on Wednesday, and a guy from one poultry company was asking us if we still have any poultry graduates looking for a job,” he said. “I just got off the phone with another poultry company here in north Georgia. It’s the same thing.”The need for poultry science graduates hasn’t let up, despite the economic downturn.“When [a poultry company] loses a position, they hire back,” Fairchild said. “So we’ve been seeing steady hiring going on the entire time.”Ivelisse Milanes graduated with a poultry science degree in May. She took time out of her new job to help out with Avian Adventures.“It’s daunting and scary at the same time” to start training the next group of poultry scientists, she said, “but it’s awesome. If you do it right, you’re so proud of what can come of it, of what they can achieve.”Major decisionsChrisley knew she wanted to be a poultry scientist when she was five. “When everybody else had an imaginary friend, I had my Plymouth chicken,” she said.She works with chickens almost every summer, and she’s fascinated by the research that can be accomplished through the birds.Poultry science is also a passion for West Virginia junior Wes Davis. He tracked down the UGA program after attending a similar camp at North Carolina State University last year. He used Avian Adventures as a chance to check out the UGA campus.Davis wants to research alternative housing systems for laying hens, something he has been interested in since California passed Proposition 2, also known as the Standards for Confining Farm Animals initiative.“There’s a lot more research emphasis here,” Davis said, comparing the UGA program to other universities he’s visited.Other students who attended said medical school or veterinary medicine is their ultimate college goal. And now they’ve had surgery experience.“It’s so good to see young people who are interested and really care. They sort of shoot the stereotype of kids who aren’t engaged and don’t care about their future and the future of the world,” Lacy said. “All of these kids you can just tell are going to be successful in whatever they do, whether they end up in agriculture or not.”last_img read more

Colombian Minister of Justice Yesid Reyes concerned over rise of synthetic drugs

first_imgColombian Minister of Justice Yesid Reyes said he’s concerned the increased growth of synthetic drugs in Europe could cause larger problems in his country, where designer drug use is greater than in neighboring countries. Pink cocaine, which was first made in The Netherlands, is attractive to narco-traffickers because it can be sold for more than cocaine. The drug can be diluted into liquids, making it harder to detect. Unlike substances such as marijuana, cocaine, and heroin, synthetic drugs are made exclusively from chemicals, not plants. One such drug, 2CB – commonly known as pink cocaine – has been on the rise in Colombia. It has led to an uptick in violence among drug cartels and organized crime groups which are seeking to control the synthetic drugs market. Until the emergence of pink cocaine, other illicit substances, including MDMA, which is known as ecstasy, and LSD, have dominated the synthetic drug market in Colombia. “We must recognize that to achieve adequate and harmonized international work demanded by the appearance of synthetic drugs, it is necessary to ‘decocaine-ize’ the problem of drugs in the region,” said Bo Mathiasen, the chief of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNDOC) in Colombia The production of designer drugs is booming, Reyes said. On average, drug traffickers and their operatives create a new synthetic drug every six days. Synthetic drugs are considered much more dangerous than traditional drugs because they drastically change chemical balances in the brain, which can be lethal. Colombian Minister of Justice Yesid Reyes said he’s concerned the increased growth of synthetic drugs in Europe could cause larger problems in his country, where designer drug use is greater than in neighboring countries. The production of designer drugs is booming, Reyes said. On average, drug traffickers and their operatives create a new synthetic drug every six days. The United Nations controls 234 substances, but there are 388 new psychoactive substances that are unregulated, creating a problem, according to Reyes. “The possibilities of molecular combination are virtually endless, so the output is easier and can be changed and therefore, is more difficult to control,” he said last week at the first international meeting on the issue of synthetic drugs, which occurred in Colombia’s coastal city of Santa Marta, the capital of the department of Magdalena. By Dialogo October 22, 2014 Unlike substances such as marijuana, cocaine, and heroin, synthetic drugs are made exclusively from chemicals, not plants. One such drug, 2CB – commonly known as pink cocaine – has been on the rise in Colombia. It has led to an uptick in violence among drug cartels and organized crime groups which are seeking to control the synthetic drugs market. Until the emergence of pink cocaine, other illicit substances, including MDMA, which is known as ecstasy, and LSD, have dominated the synthetic drug market in Colombia. Héctor Largo, who was wanted in connection with several homicides in the western department of Valle de Cauca, allegedly oversaw clandestine laboratories in the city of Cali that produced synthetic drugs and trafficked them nationwide. “We must recognize that to achieve adequate and harmonized international work demanded by the appearance of synthetic drugs, it is necessary to ‘decocaine-ize’ the problem of drugs in the region,” said Bo Mathiasen, the chief of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNDOC) in Colombia “It is a challenge worldwide, producing legislation to monitor new drugs because it takes governments longer to produce legal standards than for traffickers to introduce new chemical variations that sidestep the law recently issued,” Reyes said. Criminals sell more than 230 forms of designer drugs in Colombia, according to Gen. José Roberto León Riaño, the director of the Colombian National Police (PNC). The United Nations controls 234 substances, but there are 388 new psychoactive substances that are unregulated, creating a problem, according to Reyes. Héctor Largo, who was wanted in connection with several homicides in the western department of Valle de Cauca, allegedly oversaw clandestine laboratories in the city of Cali that produced synthetic drugs and trafficked them nationwide. “It is a challenge worldwide, producing legislation to monitor new drugs because it takes governments longer to produce legal standards than for traffickers to introduce new chemical variations that sidestep the law recently issued,” Reyes said. In March, PNC agents in the city of Pereira, in the department of Risaralda arrested suspected drug trafficker Héctor Castro, who is also known aka “Héctor Largo” and “Tsar.” Until police captured him, Héctor Largo was the the alleged leader of the country’s biggest synthetic drug ring and a suspected member of Clan Úsuga, one of largest drug trafficking groups in Colombia. “The possibilities of molecular combination are virtually endless, so the output is easier and can be changed and therefore, is more difficult to control,” he said last week at the first international meeting on the issue of synthetic drugs, which occurred in Colombia’s coastal city of Santa Marta, the capital of the department of Magdalena. Criminals sell more than 230 forms of designer drugs in Colombia, according to Gen. José Roberto León Riaño, the director of the Colombian National Police (PNC). In March, PNC agents in the city of Pereira, in the department of Risaralda arrested suspected drug trafficker Héctor Castro, who is also known aka “Héctor Largo” and “Tsar.” Until police captured him, Héctor Largo was the the alleged leader of the country’s biggest synthetic drug ring and a suspected member of Clan Úsuga, one of largest drug trafficking groups in Colombia. Synthetic drugs are considered much more dangerous than traditional drugs because they drastically change chemical balances in the brain, which can be lethal. Pink cocaine, which was first made in The Netherlands, is attractive to narco-traffickers because it can be sold for more than cocaine. The drug can be diluted into liquids, making it harder to detect. last_img read more

Lending Perspectives: Tips for making your auto loan approach COVID-19 proof

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Last month, I shared my thoughts on the difference between our COVID-19 recession and The Great Recession from the perspective of the potential for auto loan growth in 2021. This month, I’d like to provide a checklist of sorts for your auto lending strategy.Indirect LendingIf you’re a credit union making indirect auto loans, you have to ask yourself almost every day this one question: “What is our value proposition?” In reality, if your value to the dealership is that you “buy paper,” it’s never been good enough in the past and it sure isn’t good enough today. The best credit unions see dealers not only as a source of loans, but as a business partner. You need to understand and be concerned about the dealer’s business!How flexible is your program; do you have reasonable guidelines so that a dealer has some room to put together a deal? I often see a lender try to unduly limit the amount of “back-end” products like mechanical breakdown and other protection packages. While a dealer can certainly be overly focused on extracting every penny of profit from each loan via product sales, I believe it’s better to manage from a macro level and deal with the consistent offenders than trying to limit to a certain dollar of products per loan. This is placeholder text continue reading »center_img This post is currently collecting data…last_img read more

Industry puts weight behind sellers’ survey

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img