Tag: Halie

Solskjaer takes blame for sluggish Man Utd display

first_imgManchester United caretaker manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has taken the blame for his side’s poor showing against Reading on Saturday.The Red Devils beat the Championship side 2-0 at Old Trafford but Reading were arguably the better side and had 60 per cent possession.The Royals also completed nearly 600 passes, compared to United’s 400 and had five more shots than the hosts. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? However, speaking to BBC Sport after the game, the Norwegian blamed United’s lack of cohesion on the number of changes he made to the side.“There were nine changes,” said Solskjaer. “It’s never easy to get the rhythm and the tempo and the relations because they take a touch and then look at each other, they’re not used to playing with together. “Even though we train together it’s different when you’re out there at Old Trafford. So, that was down to me a bit and again I need to see them out there to see how they reaction when we concede a goal. We struggled today but we came through.Solskjaer handed the likes of Sergio Romero, Diogo Dalot, Matteo Darmian, Scott McTominay, Andreas Pereira and Fred rare starts, while also giving attacker Alexis Sanchez and Romelu Luakaku their first starts for a number of weeks as they step up their recovery from respective injuries.Despite voicing his disappointment United’s performance, Solskjaer was at least pleased with the game’s outcome.”It was a tough game, but 2-0 and a clean sheet [is good],” the 45-year-old said in a separate interview with MUTV . “I made it tough for us because when you make nine changes it is never easy for a team that has never played together so delighted that we are in the next round. “We work together every single day, every single game and of course we know we need some fitness work and work on relations but today I put a team together that has never played together and we are through so that is good.”last_img read more

New Mexico joining effort to rehabilitate historic theatres

by Russell Contreras, The Associated Press Posted May 23, 2016 9:16 am MDT Last Updated May 23, 2016 at 10:20 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email This Sunday, May 22, 2016 photo shows the newly refurbished Shuler Theater in downtown Raton, N.M. The theater is one of many theaters in rural New Mexico towns being revitalized thanks to a state initiative. A New Mexico economic development program, similar to efforts in Iowa and Illinois, seeks to save the often-forgotten theaters in small cities and towns with help on refurbishing buildings and grants for new digital projection and sound equipment. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras) New Mexico joining effort to rehabilitate historic theatres RATON, N.M. – For years, the Shuler Theater in this once-booming New Mexico mining town sat empty in a desolate downtown. It had long passed its heyday as a hot spot for Italian immigrants and Hispanic workers who visited to take in a travelling show or a newly released movie.But today the 101-year-old Raton venue again is attracting audiences from as far as Trinidad, Colorado just across the state line for variety shows and will soon be ready to screen any Star Wars movie. That change comes as New Mexico is joining other states in pushing an initiative to revitalize downtown districts in isolated, small towns by rehabilitating aging, historic theatres.An economic development program, similar to efforts in Iowa and Illinois, seeks save the often-forgotten facilities like the Shuler Theater with help on refurbishing buildings and grants for new digital projection and sound equipment. With state funding, cities can develop new business plans and retool theatres’ dusty interiors so they can become main attractions in rural areas, New Mexico Economic Development Department Secretary Jon Barela said.“These theatres are part of our history,” said Barela, who went to a small theatre in Las Cruces as a child. “They are beautiful architectural gems and they are anchors of the community.”Since January 2013, the state has set aside around $100,000 each for eight theatres, Barela said.Like refurbished small theatres in other states, New Mexico officials believe reviving theatres in ranching towns and small cities near American Indian reservations will help create jobs in struggling downtown districts and spark excitement in entertainment deserts. Some, such as El Morro Theatre in Gallup, New Mexico, are located along the iconic Route 66 next to the Navajo Nation while others, such as the Lyceum Theater in Clovis, sit just across the New Mexico-Texas state line.The theatres serve as places audiences can take in a newly released film or play.Barela said he came up with the idea about reviving theatres after visiting Raton’s Shuler Theater and learning about planned renovations. Hours later, he was in Clayton and hearing about the closing of its theatre. Residents in the northeastern New Mexico community would be forced to travel around 80 miles to see a movie, he discovered.Barela said he had no idea that similar publicly and privately funded programs were taking place in other states.For example, the Iowa Economic Development Authority’s Iowa Downtown Resource Center announced last year a pilot program aimed at rescuing performance venues in historic buildings in seven rural communities. The Illinois Historic Preservation Agency also has helped historic theatres like the 500-seat Phoenix Opera House in Rushville.Ken Stein, president of the League of Historic American Theaters, said a historic theatre in a small city has the potential to sustain 27 full-time-equivalent jobs and generate around $84,000 in revenue for state and local governments.Bill Fegan, who helps run the Shuler Theater in Raton, says the revamped venue is already helping the city’s downtown. This week, a new Italian restaurant opened. “We have people walking around downtown when we have shows,” Fegan said. “It feels alive.”Tabatha Lawson, executive director of Lovington Main Street in Lovington, New Mexico, said the newly refurbished Lea Theatre is keeping residents in town for entertainment. “Some residents are so excited because they remember coming here as kids,” Lawson said. “And they end up telling us about their first kiss.”___Follow Russell Contreras on Twitter at http://twitter.com/russcontreras. His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/russell-contreras. read more