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Millions of dollars change hands in property transactions across Qld

first_imgRay White auctioneer Mitch Peereboom pictured at the auction of 44 Merle St, Carina, Brisbane 11th of August 2018. (AAP Image/Josh Woning)Ray White Holland Park principal Piers Crawford presented 44 Merle St to auction at 9am, with more than 30 people, including many neighbours, in attendance. According to CoreLogic, the vendor purchased the 1.28ha block of land in 1998 for $450,000.Also purchased in 1998, but for just $159,000, Ray White Spring Hill agent Sam Alroe’s listing at 55 Rusden St, Kelvin Grove was the third highest viewed auction property on realestate.com.au last week. Auction winners pictured at the auction of 44 Merle St, Carina, Brisbane 11th of August 2018. (AAP Image/Josh Woning) Attracting an audience of more than 50 people and two registered bidders, the property sold under the hammer for more than four times what the owner bought it for two decades ago.Two registered bidders raised their hand to purchase the home, with an opening bid of $500,000.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours ago >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<< SOLD: 55 Rusden St, Kelvin Grove sold for $715,000 at auction on Saturday, August 11, 2018. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:33Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenKelvin Grove property sale01:34QUEENSLAND’S highest viewed auction property on realestate.com.au for last week sold for a whopping $2,670,000 yesterday. Potential buyers pictured at the auction of 44 Merle St, Carina, Brisbane 11th of August 2018. (AAP Image/Josh Woning)center_img Two of the four registered bidders vied to buy the home, with bidding starting at $500,000.After just two increases of $50,000, the auction was paused upon a $600,000 bid and negotiations started.After about 15 minutes of negotiations, Ray White Queensland chief auctioneer Mitch Peereboom announced the property was on the market at $602,500. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:34Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p288p288p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenMillions change hands at auctions04:35 Ray White Bridgeman Downs salesperson Sonya Treloar said 10 bidders registered to buy 261 Wyampa Rd, Bald Hills, including a phone bidder calling all from Greece. >>TWO TIGHTLY HELD BRISBANE HOMES LINED UP FOR THE GAVEL<< “The opening bid was $2 million and it fired right up to $2.6 million, and went … up in tens, and then it was sold at $2,670,000,” she said.“A local family bought it with four children and it’s going to be their family home.” Bidding increased in $50,000 lots until it reached $650,000, when auctioneer and Ray White Spring Hill principal Haesley Cush placed a bid on behalf of the vendor of $675,000.Bidding reached $700,000, at which point the auction was paused and negotiations started. After about 10 minutes of negotiations the home was on the market and sold at $715,000 to a young couple.A Carina property changed hands for the first time in 34 years, when it sold at auction yesterday for $602,500. The vendor purchased 261 Wyampa Rd, Bald Hills 20 years ago for $450,000. According to CoreLogic, the current vendor purchased the property in 1984 for just $96,500.last_img read more

Price pressures push manufacturing jobs abroad

first_img“It’s a tough balancing act,” said Baker, who says 1,100 of SanDisk’s 2,800 employees work here. And their median salary – before benefits and options – is “well over $100,000.” Not surprisingly, however, most of SanDisk’s remaining 1,700 employees work at low-cost manufacturing sites in Asia to help keep MP3 players around $250 and flash memory cards around $25. “There is a relentless pressure to drive down costs in our category,” Baker said. SanDisk’s situation encapsulates an ongoing shift in the U.S. economy away from manufacturing and toward a service-based economy. And given that manufacturing wages in the U.S. are, on average, substantially higher than service-sector paychecks, there is considerable debate about whether the shifting economic tides will create enough good-paying service-sector jobs to offset the manufacturing losses and keep Americans living at the standard to which they have become accustomed. Economists disagree on these big-picture questions, but there is a consensus about what people should do to secure their own futures – keep their skills current. There is no doubt about the basic fact that manufacturing jobs by and large pay better salaries than the average service-sector position, as a data analysis by Matthew Kazmierczak, research vice president for the American Electronics Association, makes clear. Looking back at the last five years of federal data, Kazmierczak calculated that the U.S. lost about 1.1 million manufacturing jobs between 2002 and 2006. The 14.1million Americans who still had factory jobs last year earned an average of $51,425. During those same five years, U.S. employers created nearly 5 million service-sector jobs. The 84 million Americans working in the service sector in 2006 earned an average of $40,544. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! By Tom Abate SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE At SanDisk Corp. headquarters in Milpitas, human resources chief Tom Baker wrestles with a conundrum that ripples through the U.S. economy. SanDisk’s employees want hefty paychecks, and the company has to pay them to get the best engineers, product managers and marketers. But its customers demand low prices for the MP3 players and flash memory that made SanDisk a $3.3 billion company in 2006. last_img read more