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Millions of dollars change hands in property transactions across Qld

first_imgRay White auctioneer Mitch Peereboom pictured at the auction of 44 Merle St, Carina, Brisbane 11th of August 2018. (AAP Image/Josh Woning)Ray White Holland Park principal Piers Crawford presented 44 Merle St to auction at 9am, with more than 30 people, including many neighbours, in attendance. According to CoreLogic, the vendor purchased the 1.28ha block of land in 1998 for $450,000.Also purchased in 1998, but for just $159,000, Ray White Spring Hill agent Sam Alroe’s listing at 55 Rusden St, Kelvin Grove was the third highest viewed auction property on realestate.com.au last week. Auction winners pictured at the auction of 44 Merle St, Carina, Brisbane 11th of August 2018. (AAP Image/Josh Woning) Attracting an audience of more than 50 people and two registered bidders, the property sold under the hammer for more than four times what the owner bought it for two decades ago.Two registered bidders raised their hand to purchase the home, with an opening bid of $500,000.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours ago >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<< SOLD: 55 Rusden St, Kelvin Grove sold for $715,000 at auction on Saturday, August 11, 2018. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:33Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenKelvin Grove property sale01:34QUEENSLAND’S highest viewed auction property on realestate.com.au for last week sold for a whopping $2,670,000 yesterday. Potential buyers pictured at the auction of 44 Merle St, Carina, Brisbane 11th of August 2018. (AAP Image/Josh Woning)center_img Two of the four registered bidders vied to buy the home, with bidding starting at $500,000.After just two increases of $50,000, the auction was paused upon a $600,000 bid and negotiations started.After about 15 minutes of negotiations, Ray White Queensland chief auctioneer Mitch Peereboom announced the property was on the market at $602,500. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:34Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p288p288p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenMillions change hands at auctions04:35 Ray White Bridgeman Downs salesperson Sonya Treloar said 10 bidders registered to buy 261 Wyampa Rd, Bald Hills, including a phone bidder calling all from Greece. >>TWO TIGHTLY HELD BRISBANE HOMES LINED UP FOR THE GAVEL<< “The opening bid was $2 million and it fired right up to $2.6 million, and went … up in tens, and then it was sold at $2,670,000,” she said.“A local family bought it with four children and it’s going to be their family home.” Bidding increased in $50,000 lots until it reached $650,000, when auctioneer and Ray White Spring Hill principal Haesley Cush placed a bid on behalf of the vendor of $675,000.Bidding reached $700,000, at which point the auction was paused and negotiations started. After about 10 minutes of negotiations the home was on the market and sold at $715,000 to a young couple.A Carina property changed hands for the first time in 34 years, when it sold at auction yesterday for $602,500. The vendor purchased 261 Wyampa Rd, Bald Hills 20 years ago for $450,000. According to CoreLogic, the current vendor purchased the property in 1984 for just $96,500.last_img read more

Wilson discusses technology disparities at Harvard

first_imgCAMBRIDGE, Mass. — The transition to a digital society is negatively threatening and marginalizing those at the bottom, Annenberg Dean Ernest J. Wilson III said at the Harvard University W.E.B. Du Bois Lecture Series this week.The digital age · Dean Ernest J. Wilson III analyzes digital-era technologies and their impact on culture in a lecture at Harvard University. – Eric Burse | Daily TrojanBy delivering the three-day lecture series, which ended Thursday, Wilson joined previous Du Bois lecturers, including former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Cornel West, a prominent professor in Princeton University’s Center for African-American Studies.The lecture series is named after scholar, writer, editor and civil rights pioneer W.E.B. Du Bois, the first African American to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard University.Wilson’s remarks during the series focused on his study of a wide variety of contemporary digital-era issues.Wilson described a “scissor effect” in which minority ownership, control and content in media assets has decreased with the growth of media dominance and importance. In 2009, Wilson said, African-Americans owned 1 percent of media properties. Today, that number has declined to 0.7 percent.“We should care about this because we are citizens and these are matters of the life and death of democracy,” Wilson said. “The number of African-Americans and other people of color in positions of senior leadership and ownership of media properties is either stagnant or declining.”Brandon Terry, a post-doctoral student at Harvard, said Wilson’s talk touched upon a very pertinent issue.“Dean Wilson is tackling probably the most crucial issue in politics and economics right now,” Terry said. “We’re on the cusp of an enormous transformation of economy and society which is brought on by digital innovation.”Wilson’s remarks considered how Du Bois would react and think about this new digital divide. Wilson set up a website, www.DigitalDubois.net several weeks before the series. On the site, Wilson posted four questions, including how the introduction of new communication technologies has affected the African-American community and what the impact has been on minority interaction with other communities.Benjamin Todd Jealous, CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, was among those who listed responses.“Du Bois was a communicator’s communicator,” Jealous wrote. “I have no doubt that Du Bois would use digital media and mobile technology to do what he did in his prime — reach out, inspire, unify and activate members of the black community and people of good conscience of all colors.”Michael Copps, a senior adviser for Common Cause, also contributed a post to the website.“Broadband is the essential infrastructure of the Twenty-first century,” Copps wrote. “This is a civil rights issue — perhaps the preeminent one confronting us right now, because the outcome of so many other great challenges resides on how we deal with this one. Du Bois would have recognized this … we should recognize it, too.”In his closing remarks before a lecture room filled with Harvard students and academics, Wilson said giving the lectures was not just a professional pleasure, but a personal one.Wilson’s grandfather graduated from Harvard in 1910 when Du Bois was still a student there. A picture of Wilson’s grandfather alongside Du Bois was displayed on screens during the event.[Correction: A previous version of this article stated Wilson’s grandfather gradated from Harvard in 1910 when Du Bois was a student there. Du Bois received a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1895.]“What I want to accomplish with these lectures is inspiring a rethinking of our political agenda on the topic,” Wilson said. “These issues are so important for the  future of America and for people of color to a transition of an information-based society. This is an issue much too important to be left up to economists and policy makers.”last_img read more