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SBA Vermont Small Business Person of the Year and Champion Award Celebration

first_imgWHERE:          Waterfront Park, BurlingtonIn downtown Burlington, follow Main Street to the corner of Main and Battery.  Turn right on Lake Street.  Look for the tents at the end of Lake Street.Parking is available at College and Lake Streets, and in lots and garages throughout downtown Burlington. WHEN:           Wednesday, June 7, 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. SBA Vermont Small Business Person of the Year and Champion Award CelebrationNEWS EVENT:     The 2006 Vermont Small Business Person of the Year and Champion Award recipients will be honored by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) at a ceremony presented by Vermont Business Magazine at Burlington’s Waterfront Park.  Gov. James Douglas will present the Small Business Person of the Year award to John Wall, Wall/Goldfinger, Inc., Northfield, Vermont, with additional remarks by Mayor Bob Kiss, City of Burlington, SBA Regional Administrator Charlie Summers, and others.  Champion awards will be presented to the following individuals:Janet Bullard, Vermont Commission on Women, Montpelier;James Keyes, Citizens Bank, Burlington;Mark Johnson, WDEV Radio, Waterbury;Robert Johnson, Omega Optical, Brattleboro;Laurie Hammond, Triple Loop Skate & Dance, Colchester;John Durfee & Lang Durfee, Bethel Mills, Inc., Bethel Mills;Stephen Brochu, Vermont Department of Labor, St. Johnsbury; andMargaret Ferguson, Micro Business Development Program, Barre.last_img read more

Kotoko News: Coach Duncan to be unveiled on Thursday

first_imgCoach David Duncan will be formally introduced to the media and the general public at Kotoko’s secretariat in Kumasi on Thursday at 9:30am.Duncan, who arrived in Kumasi on Wednesday is expected to meet management before Thursday’s event. Kotoko and Coach Duncan have agreed on a two-year contract.Coach Duncan was in Algeria, where Kotoko drew 0-0 with MC El Eulma last Saturday.Although Duncan was in the North African country only to “observe” proceedings ahead of the second leg game, he ended up on the bench, teaming up with deputy coach, Michael Osei to secure what many have termed as a “desirable” away result.last_img

Tiger Airways names new Australian head honcho

first_imgTiger Airways has named a Managing Director for its Australian operations set to take over from Shelley Roberts when she leaves the airline in coming months.Crawford Rix, the former head of UK carrier bmibaby, will be relocating to Melbourne in order to assume the new position soon, though the exact start date of his employment is yet to be announced.“We are delighted that Crawford will be joining us later in the year.  With his experience and track record, he will be a great asset to the business,” said Tony Davis, Tiger Airways Holdings Group CEO.“Shelley has established Tiger Airways Australia as a major national airline, and led it from infancy to profitability.  After completing her hand-over to Crawford, she intends to take a well deserved break.”Tiger Airways started its Australian domestic operations in 2007 under the guidance of Chris Ward and Ms Roberts had assumed the helm in the middle of 2008. <a href=”http://www.etbtravelnews.global/click/164c6/” target=”_blank”><img src=”http://adsvr.travelads.biz/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=10&amp;cb=INSERT_RANDOM_NUMBER_HERE&amp;n=a5c63036″ border=”0″ alt=””></a> Source = e-Travel Blackboard: W.Xlast_img read more

Scientists discover Big Bang of Alzheimers disease

first_imgJul 11 2018Scientists have discovered a “Big Bang” of Alzheimer’s disease – the precise point at which a healthy protein becomes toxic but has not yet formed deadly tangles in the brain.A study from UT Southwestern’s O’Donnell Brain Institute provides novel insight into the shape-shifting nature of a tau molecule just before it begins sticking to itself to form larger aggregates. The revelation offers a new strategy to detect the devastating disease before it takes hold and has spawned an effort to develop treatments that stabilize tau proteins before they shift shape.”We think of this as the Big Bang of tau pathology. This is a way of peering to the very beginning of the disease process.”Dr. Mark Diamond, Director for UT Southwestern’s Center for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases “This is perhaps the biggest finding we have made to date, though it will likely be some time before any benefits materialize in the clinic. This changes much of how we think about the problem,” said Dr. Marc Diamond, Director for UT Southwestern’s Center for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases and a leading dementia expert credited with determining that tau acts like a prion – an infectious protein that can self-replicate.The study published in eLife contradicts the previous belief that an isolated tau protein has no distinct shape and is only harmful after it begins to assemble with other tau proteins to form the distinct tangles seen in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.Scientists made the discovery after extracting tau proteins from human brains and isolating them as single molecules. They found that the harmful form of tau exposes a part of itself that is normally folded inside. This exposed portion causes it to stick to other tau proteins, enabling the formation of tangles that kill neurons.”We think of this as the Big Bang of tau pathology,” said Dr. Diamond, referring to the prevailing scientific theory about the formation of the universe. “This is a way of peering to the very beginning of the disease process. It moves us backward to a very discreet point where we see the appearance of the first molecular change that leads to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s. This work relied on a close collaboration with my colleague, Dr. Lukasz Joachimiak.”Related StoriesWhy women who work are less likely to develop dementiaHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionIT Faces the Digital Pathology Data TsunamiDespite billions of dollars spent on clinical trials through the decades, Alzheimer’s disease remains one of the most devastating and baffling diseases in the world, affecting more than 5 million Americans alone.Dr. Diamond is hopeful the scientific field has turned a corner, noting that identifying the genesis of the disease provides scientists a vital target in diagnosing the condition at its earliest stage, before the symptoms of memory loss and cognitive decline become apparent.His team’s next steps are to develop a simple clinical test that examines a patient’s blood or spinal fluid to detect the first biological signs of the abnormal tau protein. But just as important, Dr. Diamond said, efforts are underway to develop a treatment that would make the diagnosis actionable.He cites a compelling reason for cautious optimism: Tafamidis, a recently approved drug, stabilizes a different shape-shifting protein called transthyretin that causes deadly protein accumulation in the heart, similar to how tau overwhelms the brain.”The hunt is on to build on this finding and make a treatment that blocks the neurodegeneration process where it begins,” Dr. Diamond said. “If it works, the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease could be substantially reduced. That would be amazing.”Dr. Diamond’s lab, at the forefront of many notable findings relating to tau, previously determined that tau acts like a prion – an infectious protein that can spread like a virus through the brain. The lab has determined that tau protein in the human brain can form many distinct strains, or self-replicating structures, and developed methods to reproduce them in the laboratory. He said his newest research indicates that a single pathological form of tau protein may have multiple possible shapes, each associated with a different form of dementia.Source: https://www.utsouthwestern.edu/newsroom/articles/year-2018/genesis-of-disease.htmllast_img read more