first_imgIt’s something Oh is all too aware of.Asked by news.com.au during the promotional trail for Killing Eve, before her historic Emmy nomination today, whether she had seen much change or momentum in terms of Asian representation on American TV, she said: “The change is slow, and I mean it in the most profound way in how profoundly frustrating it is and has been.“I’ve been in this industry for a long time and what I’ve seen and experienced is how long it takes to make actual real change — and it’s not the real change our community is needing and seeking.“Where is our Black Panther? I know our community wants that and our community is impatient for it.”Oh stars in the critically acclaimed Killing Eve. Picture: BBC America via APSource:APOh said that Asian-Americans — Oh is actually Canadian but has lived in the US for many years — don’t carry the same “burden in terms of the safety for our bodies” as African-Americans and Americans of Latino descent do, but at the heart of Asian representation, it’s about visibility. Advertisement Sandra Oh has made history with her Emmy nomination for Killing Eve. Picture: BBC America via APSource:AP Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementcenter_img Facebook Login/Register With: KILLING Eve and Grey’s Anatomy star Sandra Oh broke a significant boundary in Hollywood today.Sandra became the first female actor of Asian descent to be nominated for an Emmy in a lead acting category. Her performance as Eve Polastri in the BBC America series, airing locally on ABC, has won wide acclaim from critics and audiences.But if you’re thinking that surely it can’t be right that she’s the first, that it didn’t happen until 2018, be assured that she is. And that is in large part due to the scarcity of roles for actors of Asian descent on American TV — especially lead roles. Twitterlast_img

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